2020, Mercedes-Benz GLB Review

2020, Mercedes-Benz GLB Review

2020 Mercedes-Benz GLB Review
Comfort Over Performance
Overall, the GLB’s road is modestly built and comfortable but missing the sporty character you’d expect after its Mercedes lineage and athletic styling.

Providing stop power. The engine is powered by a single 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, 221 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque combined with an eight-speed dual-clutch automatic that chooses the highest speed.
Across the city, shifts are stylish and times are awkward but at highway speeds it absorbs static energy quickly and uninterruptedly. In sports mode it spreads the popping line and creates a steering feel.
An upcoming AMG version will power up to 302 hp and combine different performance-tuned devices; The regular version will lead to more comfort than performance. The passenger is nice with the nice, coop, fault-absorbing suspension tune but the handling feels very un-Mercedes. Its huge turning circle and significant physical leech make it feel unbalanced, feeling, especially around the corners. My test model was equipped with adaptive suspension suspension (9990) which made things a bit more visually appealing for a more complex, more compelling drive.
It was great with a slightly autonomous driver assistance system that combines radar adaptive cruise control and lane-centering steering. The second is one of the most subtle and gentle systems I have tested – unlike some others that have ping pong ball-type action in lane corrections.
Control overhaul
Many car manufacturers have moved away from trackpads and control knocks and moved to larger touchscreen multimedia systems, so I mentioned GLB’s touchpad, but it may be the latest version of the Mercedes-Benz user interface or the only way to control MBUX. Other options include a central touchscreen, steering-wheel control and a hey Mercedes! Voice activation.
I’m biased for the touchscreen, which I always like to use. Comes standard with a 7.0-inch digital gauge display and 7.0-inch touchscreen (measured diagonally all over the place); My car was lined with an extended dual 10.25-inch screen at the top of the dashboard; These look modern and slot and they were ready to use with a few caution.
The screen itself is responsive but not every function was assembled, so I occasionally had to pivot on the trackpad and its support buttons for things like opening the security system menu or going back to the home screen.
Overall, the menu structure of the system is simple. For example, inputting a nave destination was straightforward, but some functions take more steps like saving their audio station presets than saving, I think the Volvo system is less difficult, but MMUX is easier to diagnose than the Lexus or Land Rover system – the more modern Migraine in making.
The GLB’s wide screen and larger, clearer graphics are great for visibility but here again things are a bit weird. Some functions like external camera and navigation may appear together on the screen together which is helpful, but this system is not extended to other functions. For example, it would be helpful to share the screen between navigation and audio.
I am bound by the algorithmic augmented-video component of certain navigation systems, which use a front-facing camera in harmony with the navigation system to display street names and directions above the video image.
Protection and dollars
The 2020 GLB base, front-wheel-drive trim starts at 37 37,595 – the discovery of the big Land Rover and less than the Lexus RX350L and slightly less than the multi-size Volvo XC60 (all price destinations included). Al 850 extra in the third row.
While the original price is reasonable, if you want luxury features like heated and ventilated seats ($ 1,030), a head-up display (100,100), blind spot monitoring (5 550) or larger, options are added quickly. options available multimedia screen (bundled in a 2,200 premium package).
Active brake assistance includes automatic emergency braking standards, and optional safety features include stop-and-stop cruise control, blind spot assistance with lane change assistance, and a park assistance system.
Many of them are bundled into a driver assistance package (2,250) or a parking assistance package ($ 1,090) and are not available as a stand-alone option.
There are enough opinions from all parties in GLB but is there any tips-scale to choose from? The answer is in the third row. If you are interested in a small Mercedes SEV with a Mercedes third row then you have a love: GLB. If the third row is not necessary for you, there are many other delightful loves in the price range of GLB.

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